Discussion Central

Expand all | Collapse all

When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

  • 1.  When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    SENIOR MEMBER
    Posted 01-30-2019 16:49

    Nouryon, formerly AkzoNobel Specialty Chemicals has initiated the third Imagine Chemistry effort looking for open collaboration with startups, scale-ups, and researchers to work with us to tackle some of the biggest challenges facing the chemicals industry. The challenges this year include bio-based surfactants, sensors for demanding environments, nano-particles, chemical innovations that push the frontiers and label-free chemistries. The last challenge, "label-free chemistries" is what prompts my question to the AIChE Discussion site. We have had only one submission so far and I thought this group could provide some valuable insight into the question "What does label-free chemistries mean to you and have you heard of the term? In addition, does anyone think a better term should be used and any suggestions on organizations to reach out to with this challenge. I look forward to your responses.



    ------------------------------
    Robert Haynes
    Common Application Team Leader
    Nouryon
    Marietta GA
    ------------------------------


  • 2.  RE: When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    SENIOR MEMBER
    Posted 01-31-2019 08:28
    ​Robert,

    When I see or hear the phrase "label free chemistries", one of 2 two things come to mind.

    The first is that a math/science averse "creative person" (marketing) came up with it, and sold it to a bunch of other marketers, and it means nothing to anyone who deals with chemistry. A nonsequitur.

    The second is that this must apply to an specialty or product area in which I have never worked, or it's some recent thing that has come up from academia or pure R&D (again, an area in which I have never worked).

    I suspect that most people in chemistry and chem processing have similar responses, so no surprise you've had only one submission.  Given time and reason to ponder upon it, I could come up with some, perhaps, useful or reasonable meaning.

    ------------------------------
    Bruce Bullough
    Portage, MI
    ------------------------------



  • 3.  RE: When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    SENIOR MEMBER
    Posted 02-02-2019 10:25
    To me, Label Free Chemistry means an unsafe laboratory where the contents of containers are unlabeled, and confusion reigns.

    ------------------------------
    Brian Rutledge
    Process Engineer
    Martin Marietta
    Glen Burnie MD
    ------------------------------



  • 4.  RE: When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    SENIOR MEMBER
    Posted 02-01-2019 19:27
    (Answer was rejected by mail server first time, resending this)

    I have not heard that term before this, so have to guess at it. Current tendency in commerce seems to be tacking on various labels like "sustainable" or "responsible". There is nothing wrong with being either, but it would be nice if that was the case by default. I do not see "FDA approved" food products because they are all FDA approved (or should be), making the label redundant. I suspect that is what "label-free" chemistry is about. (Watch me be way off.)

    I cannot answer the second part of the question.




  • 5.  RE: When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    SENIOR MEMBER
    Posted 02-02-2019 00:45
    I'm afraid I have to agree with Bruce.  I spent 40 years in the CPI and I never heard the term "label-free" chemistry!

    (...and it actually sounds kind of dangerous.  Unlabeled bottles/drums/tank trucks are forbidden for obvious reasons!)

    Seriously - I've never seen or heard the term.  Sorry.

    ------------------------------
    Ed Kronenberger MS
    Missouri City TX
    EdwardEdwardEdward
    ------------------------------



  • 6.  RE: When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    Posted 02-03-2019 19:26
    When I hear "label-free" I think of label free approaches in proteomics, in contrast to iTraq and other labeling assays.

    ---------------------------------
    Ethan Johnson
    Intern
    Biotech Without Borders
    Leonia NJ
    ---------------------------------





  • 7.  RE: When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    SENIOR MEMBER
    Posted 02-04-2019 15:52
    I would like to thank all who have responded to my question on the term "Label-Free"
    The diversity of responds do show a diversity of thoughts on the term.

    In general, it seems Europe tends to include negative labeling for certain products while
    in the United States labeling tends to be more positive, a product passes certain criteria and earns
    a label.​ While I know exceptions exist this tendency between the two markets gives the term "Label-Free" a more positive meaning in Europe.

    When I first heard the term it put me in mind of Generally Regarded as Save (GRAS) a description used when considering a products safety in the US.
    The Imagine Chemistry team defined the term as:

    Label-free - a chemistry that has no negative impact or connotation by consumers but yet provides superb performance (at reasonable cost). Meaning that there is no need to label products because of the presence of the components, even when looked at it from a very 'critical consumer' point of view.

    Finally, a new term is not a bad thing even if it comes from a marketing person. Rather it can help the consumer, developer, manufacturer get on the same page and be inspired. For instance Recycling and the symbol for recycling was once new and now is common. An incredible number of engineers, chemists and business people have made great effort to make it a reality.  I had the privilege of sending several years working on recycling newspapers and was always amazed at the amount of technical knowledge it took to make that process work.

    Please do take the time to look at the challenges for Imagine Chemistry 2019, there are some very real challenges and a desire to inspire.

    Best Regards,


    ------------------------------
    Robert Haynes
    Common Application Team Leader
    Nouryon
    Marietta GA
    ------------------------------



  • 8.  RE: When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    SENIOR MEMBER
    Posted 02-05-2019 10:05
    I originally heard the term "labelled" and "non-labelled" back in the mid 1980's.  There were a number of naphthenic base oils that were being hydrotreated at fairly low pressures--700 to 1000 psig.  It came to light that the finished oils treated at these pressures still contained polynuclear aromatics, or PNA's.  Because of the possible (or certain) carcinogenicity of PNA's, the industry moved toward higher pressures for hydrotreating.  It became common practice to assume that any oils hydrotreated at pressures higher than 1000 psig contained low (or no) PNA's.  Later lab tests were developed for testing oils for PNA concentration.  Oils with low concentrations (or no) PNA's were referred to as "non-labeled" oils.  This meant that the oil contained very low or no carcinogens (in the form of PNA's.  Oils with higher PNA concentrations were referred to as "labeled" oils.  The "labeled" name meant that the oils had to be labeled with a warning of the possible carcinogenic nature of the oil.  "Non-labeled" meant that the oil did not have to have the carcinogen warning.  Now this was 30 years ago, and this is all from my memory, so I could be "mis-remembering" some of the details.

    ------------------------------
    Stanley Snead
    L.P. Engineer
    Calumet Lubricants
    Oil City LA
    ------------------------------



  • 9.  RE: When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    SENIOR MEMBER
    Posted 02-06-2019 09:03

    The first hit in a search for "label-free chemistry" is the Wikipedia entry below.   I suspect this is more likely the context for the request for collaboration with start-ups to push the frontiers of chemistry, as opposed to unlabeled  containers or labels with restricted information.

    Label-free quantification

    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
    Jump to navigationJump to search

    Label-free quantification is a method in mass spectrometry that aims to determine the relative amount of proteins in two or more biological samples. Unlike other methods for protein quantification, label-free quantification does not use a stable isotope containing compound to chemically bind to and thus label the protein.[1][2]



    ------------------------------
    Roderick Beittel
    Principal Engineer
    Babcock Power Inc
    Marlborough MA
    ------------------------------



  • 10.  RE: When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    SENIOR MEMBER
    Posted 02-06-2019 16:47
    Roderick,

    Your point is well made. I have passed it onto the Imagine Chemistry team and suggest if we are to use the term we should add it to Wikipedia​.
    Despite what appears to be a really new word to the chemistry community we are up to three submissions for this Imagine Chemistry Challenge with March 8 being the close for the challenges.


    ------------------------------
    Robert Haynes
    Common Application Team Leader
    Nouryon
    Marietta GA
    ------------------------------



  • 11.  RE: When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    SENIOR MEMBER
    Posted 02-06-2019 16:39
    Stanley,

    Thanks for this example, while the team was thinking more about new chemistries I think your example is an excellent story about how possible responses to the challenge can be changes to our chemical process.

    Robert​

    ------------------------------
    Robert Haynes
    Common Application Team Leader
    Nouryon
    Marietta GA
    ------------------------------



  • 12.  RE: When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    SENIOR MEMBER
    Posted 02-05-2019 14:53

    Interestingly, I recall a story that David Wesson, founder of Wesson Oil, kept all his processing parameters unknown to workers and casual observers by creating his own standards for processing parameters and measurements such as "degrees Wesson" rather than known parameters like Farienheight or Celsius.  Could it be a reference to concealing chemistry for proprietary reasons within the confines of a production operation?

     

    Best regards,

     

    Pat Bush

     

    Sent from Mail for Windows 10

     






  • 13.  RE: When you hear the term label-free chemistry, what does that term mean to you, especially when that property/characteristic is being sought?

    SENIOR MEMBER
    Posted 02-05-2019 19:18
    That sounds like a terrible idea with potential to cause problems not unlike the recent cryptocurrency death has. (Nothing to do with "label-free" in this comment, but felt I had to call out the idea he (Wesson) had.